We Configured A Performance NSX But Would Still Rather Have A GT-R

Here’s why.

We talked about the options before, but
now we decided to build a strictly performance-oriented NSX. We thought we could save some money in the process. Who needs $6,000 paint anyway? The
list of options that help up performance is short but dense in terms of price. From the base price of $156,000 as
advertised on Acura’s website the cost of the new NSX shot up like a rocket,
and much like our hopes of affording the car, said rocket lost control and
spiraled down into a nuclear power plant.

We Configured A Performance NSX But Would Still Rather Have A GT-R

We Configured A Performance NSX But Would Still Rather Have A GT-R

Ranting aside the list of options we came up with comes with some interesting price points. For instance if you couldn’t before, you can now envision a $3,000 rear spoiler. Or how about protecting the engine with carbon fiber that’s not only lighter but also helps direct airflow? That’s going to run you $3,600. How about saving weight on the car’s exterior altogether with the aerodynamic carbon fiber exterior package? That’ll be $9,000. Seats are questionable in terms of how they affect performance, so we’re going to ignore that $2,500 price tag, even if they are made of semi-analine leather material. At least if you get the seats and don’t end up liking them you can leave them outside on the curb in the rain. How about wheels?

Well according to Acura’s website the exclusive interwoven polished wheels are lighter so, that means more performance…and an extra $1,500. Let’s see about saving some interior weight with the carbon fiber interior sport package. If we’re honest it’s probably just for show, but just for fun let’s check it out anyway. That will cost a further $2,900, and changes out parts of the steering wheel, one part of the dash, the pedals and… that’s it. Yes indeed the car is almost complete, but the one irresistible piece of performance-oriented equipment you can get for your NSX, is of course the upgraded brakes. Yes an improved braking system with carbon ceramic rotors and red calipers (mind you, red paint does not add braking power) is $10,600.

We Configured A Performance NSX But Would Still Rather Have A GT-R

We Configured A Performance NSX But Would Still Rather Have A GT-R

Granted good brakes are expensive, so we kind of need to give that one to Acura. Our build is complete, unless you really want to feel rich. In which case, you’ll want to spring for those seats and the interior carbon fiber package. So the question is, while it is a nice car, from a performance standpoint why the hell would you get one? The most expensive Nissan GT-R, which has comparable power and weight to the NSX (albeit sans hybrid powertrain), is the NISMO edition, and the highest cost we could price it at came to around $164,000. The NSX? With the performance options selected, comes out to almost $184,000 (without the interior carbon fiber package). So really, does all that money for the NSX go towards a far less practical car?

We Configured A Performance NSX But Would Still Rather Have A GT-R

We Configured A Performance NSX But Would Still Rather Have A GT-R

We Configured A Performance NSX But Would Still Rather Have A GT-R

We Configured A Performance NSX But Would Still Rather Have A GT-R

We Configured A Performance NSX But Would Still Rather Have A GT-R

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